beaches of indiahills of indialakes of indiaForts of indiacaves of indiaislands of india  
Festivals Dances Music Cuisine Art & Craft
North
South
East
West
North
South
East
West
North
South
East
West
North
South
East
West
North
South
East
West
  pilgrimage of indiawild life of indiahistorical places of indiawaterfalls of indiatrekking in indiatrain routs of india  

States




Enjoy your stay at RTDC's Hotel Saras or at luxury, heritage or budget hotels. Paying Guest Accommodation is also available.

Government Hotels
ITDC Bharatpur Ashok Lodge 05644-222722
Shanti Kutir (Forest Rest House) …05644-222777
RTDC Hotel Saras…05644-223700
Heritage Hotels
Laxmi Vilas Palace…05644-223523

Travel and Communication
Rail
Bharatpur is on the main Delhi-Bombay line with regular connections to Mathura, Sawai Madhopur and Kota on the same route. It is also connected with Agra.

ROAD
Bharatpur is well connected by road with Agra, Mathura, Delhi and Jaipur Regular bus services operate for all major cities.

Local Transport
City bus, Auto rickshaw, Cycle rickshaw and Tonga are available at Old Bus Stand and Railway Station. Rates are negotiable.

Guide Services
Approved tourist guides for the National Park can be hired form the Assistant Director.

Tourist Reception Center
Tel…05644-222542
&Deputy Chief Wildlife Warden, Forest Rest House
Tel…05644-222777
Guides are also available at the Bird Sanctuary gate.

Conducted Tours
Can arrange Tours Tourist Reception Center…05644-222542
POST AND TELEGRAPH OFFICES
G.P.O. Gandhi Park, Head Post Office near Jama Masjid

STUDIO
Bada Bazaar…Tel.05644-224755

IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS
Superintendent of Police …223116
Kotwali … 222548
Thana Mathura Gate …222444
Ambulance …223633
Telephone Inquiry No…197
Railway Inquiry …223535/131
Roadways Inquiry…260330

MEDICAL SERVICES
General Hospital
Zanana Hospital, Mathura Rd.Aror Nursing Home, Krishna Colony Jindal Nursing Home, Ranjeet Nagar.
Bank /Money Changers
State Bank of Bikaner & Jaipur, B.Narayan Gate…222441,223140

Tourist INFORMATION
Tourist Reception Center
Saras Circle, Agra Road …222542
ROAD DISTANCE TO IMPORTANT PLACES

FROM BHARATPUR
Agra …55Kms
Fatehpur Sikri…22kms
Mathura…39kms
Delhi…184kms
Jaipur…176kms
Alwar…117kms

 


Jaipur

Jaipur is named after its founder the warrior and astronomer sovereign Sawai Jai Singh II (ruled 1688 to 1744). The decision to move out of his hilltop capital Amer was also compelled by reasons of growing population and paucity of water. Moreover in the early seventh century the power of the great Mughals was dwindling with its aging Monarch Aurangzeb and after several centuries of invasions the north was now quite and the wealth of the kingdom had become greater than before. Seizing upon this opportune time Jai Singh planned his new capital in the planes. Jaipur is a corroborative
effort of Sawai Jai Singh's strong grounding in sciences and astrology and a Bengali architect Vidyadhar with a strong instinct for planning.
 
Air   :  The Jaipur Airport is called Sanganer Airport . There are domestic flight connections to Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Ahmedabad, Jodhpur and Udaipur. There is a single international flight to Dubai.

Train   : Connections  are from Delhi, Agra,  Mumbai ,Chennai, Bikaner, Jodhpur, Udaipur, Ahmedabad. Well connected from other states like UP, MP

Road : A convenient mode of travel to Jaipur is by road. Regular bus service of AC and Deluxe Coaches are available.
Things to See

City palace
Located in the heart of the walled city, The City Palace Complex gives you an idea about the farsightedness of the founder of Jaipur Sawai Jai Singh. He left behind a legacy of some of the most imposing and magnificent architecture, art and craft structure in the city. Sawai Jai Singh built its many buildings but some of some of the structures were also built by later rulers and some of them are even dated in the in the twentieth century too. The palace is a blend of Mughal and Rajasthani architecture and the royal family still lives in a part of the palace.
On entering the complex and before the palace proper lies the Mubarak Mahal, the palace of welcome or reception. Sawai Madho Singh built the palace in the nineteenth century. It was used as a reception centre for the visiting personage. The building now forms the Maharaja Sawai Man Singh II Museum and on display here are a wide array of royal costumes, some very exquisite and precious Pashmina (Kashmiri) Shawls, Benaras silk saris, Sanganeri prints and folk embroidery. An unusual display is that of voluminous clothes worn by Maharaja Sawai Madho Singh I (ruled 1750-68).

The Maharani's Palace, the palace of the Queen paradoxically puts a display of the Rajput weaponry. The inestimable collections of weapons date back to even 15th century and are in a remarkable state of preservation. Remarkable amongst them is scissor-action dagger. This deadly weapon when thrust in bodies the handles were release to spread the blades. The dagger was then withdrawn tearing limb from limb of the body of the hapless victim into certain fatality. Other exhibits include protective chain armours, pistols, jewelled and ivory handled swords, a belt sword, small and assorted cannons, guns, poison tipped blades and gun powder pouches. The frescos on the ceiling are amazing and well preserved.

The art gallery is located in the Diwan-I-Aam, which literally mean the Hall of public audience. The exhibits here included some very precious and ancient handwritten original manuscripts of Hindu scriptures. Particularly intriguing in miniature copies of Bhagwat Gita made in this manner so that it can be concealed out of sight of Emperor Aurangzeb's onslaught on Hindu scriptures. Some very delicate miniature paintings in Rajasthani, Mughal and Persian schools on various themes including the Ramayana are very engrossing displays. Visitors must also take a good at preserved painted ceilings. Also on display are elephant saddles called “haudha”.

Between the armoury museum and the art gallery is the Diwan-E-Khas meaning hall of private or selective audience. This is a marble paved pavilion and puts on display the world largest sterling silver object two gigantic silver vessels. These vessels were made for Maharaja Sawai Madho Singh II, who took in along with him filled with water from River Ganga for drinking. As a devout Hindu the Maharaja did not wish to risk polluted English waters. The ceiling also has large chandeliers, which are mostly protected by dust covers and opened only of festive occasions. The Guinness Book of Records accounts it has the biggest silver objects in the world.

The Chandra Mahal Palace is still occupied by the royal family but visitors can visit the ground floor where some exhibits are on display. However the visit here is worthwhile for the exquisite Peacock in the courtyard outside.

The present day royal family that takes charge of the museum has done exceptionally well in preserving this legacy in fine state maintenance and presentation. A visits to the palace is enlightening one for its extraordinary occurrence.

Inside the palace premises, there is a  multi cuisine restaurant The palace Cafe'

Jantar Mantar
Across the road from the palaces is the famous JANTAR MANTAR one of the five observatories in India . Built by Sawai Jai Singh, this is one of the largest and the best preserved. A passionate hobby of the king in the field of Astronomy, numerology, insighted him to execute this observatory and with the help of skilled labourers, they managed to create a collection of complex astronomical instruments chiselled out of stone and most of which continues to provide accurate information to this day. The most striking instrument is the Brihat Samrat yantra Sundial, an imposing yellow edifice to the far right of the observatory complex which has a 27m high gnomon arm set at an angle of 27degree.The shadow this casts moves up to 4m in an hour, and aids in the calculation of local and meridian pass time and various attributes of the heavenly bodies, including declination the angular distance of a heavenly body from the celestial equator and altitude. This highlight of the observatory has made it a centre of attraction for the tourist visiting Jaipur.

Albert hall
Located just outside the walled city is the sprawling Ram Niwas garden, which has always been a place for recreational activities since the reign of Sawai Ram Singh ji . This exquisitely designed garden with forcentry doors and a huge complex with small pools and fountains, flourishing lawns and beautiful flower beds all around was basically a famine relief project. It mostly attracted the British families where they entertained their guest and families quite often with the lavish gowns of the Men and formal colourful attires of the nobels and the high society club members, this park would come alive with the setting sun. Their individual 'BAGGIS' were parked outside in a line and the attendants served around as helpers. The children basically had a gala timely playing around in 'JHULAS'(swing) etc. During day time it was opened for the common public and by the evening it was opened for common public and by the evening it was available for exclusive lots.

Situated in the middle of the garden as a centre attraction was the exquisitely built structure of Albert Hall, which was designed by sir Swinton Jacob, a British architect who designed many palaces in Rajasthan. Combining the elements of English and north Indian architecture known as the pride of the New Jaipur opened in 1887 AD, it is a very well maintained and impressive building displaying a rich collection of Art- de- fact like paintings, carpet, ivory, stone and metal sculptures and colourful crystal works etc. Just opposite the Albert Hall is one of the oldest ZOO in the country, harbouring different species of birds and animals. Another piece of attraction near the Albert Hall, is the Ravindra Rang Manch (theatre) with a modern art gallery and an performing art theatre both indoor and open air. Recently added joints of interest are streets dotted with food stalls which promises a delicious variety of Indian fast food certainly relished by the tourists.

Statue Circle
This is a traffic roundabout In Jaipur. The Statue Circle is not only the most famed circle but the most swarmly situated too. Almost half the Jaipur passes by it. It is the favourite lounge of Jaipur and a place for evening out, with'Meals on Wheels' standing by. Strangely it acquires its name of statue circle after its figurine rather than the grand Sawai Jai Singh the founder of modern day Jaipur. His statue stands in full imperial symbols of staff and Jai Singh is made out to be holding out astrological diagrams to exemplify his proclivity for astrology. The memorial is be fitting to the great sovereign, builder and futurist. The lighting and the colourful fountains cheer up the roundabout and its surrounds.

Moti Dungri (Ganesh Temple)
In the middle of Jaipur rises a small hill Moti Dungri meaning pearl hill, because it looks hill a drop of pearl. An exotic palace is parched which is a replica of Scottish castle once occupied by Maharaja Madho Singh's son. From There on remained as a private property of the ruling family. In the recent past it served as a home for Rajmata Gaytri Devi and her estranged son Jagat Singh. The mere view of this castle is exotic enough. The highlight of this place is the famous and auspicious temple of Lord Ganesh, which is frequently visited by almost whole of Jaipur and people from outside.

Hawa Mahal
Poet king Sawai Pratap Singh built this palace of winds. This is the most easily recalled landmarks of Jaipur and is also its icon. Located in the city Palace it is best viewed from the outside for the palace is really a facade. This five-storey building overlooking the busy bazaar street is a stunning example of Rajput architecture and artistry with its pink delicately honeycombed 953 sandstone windows known as 'jharokhas'. It was originally built for the ladies of the royal household to watch everyday life and processions in the city from their veiled comfort.

Most people come here to get a view of the facade but they can also climb to the top for a wonderful view from the latticed windows. There is also a small archaeological museum there. Entry to foreigners/citizen is Rs 30/10.

Gaitore
It is the final resting place of the Maharajas of Jaipur and is located just off the Jaipur - Amber Road. Situated in a narrow valley the cenotaphs of the former Maharajas are chhatris made in typical Rajput architecture. The chhatri of Sawai Jai Singh II is of special mention for its carvings that exaggerate it.

Kanak Vrindavan
Not so old but definitely an exquisitely land scaped gardens with beautifully carved temple in beige stone, which is a vast complex with terrace sites all around and intricately carved marble columns and lattices. Located in the foothills of Nahargarh hills on the way towards Amer, this complex is a popular spot for picnic and film shoots. It should be definitely visited on the way to the three garland forts of Jaipur- Nahargarh, Jaigarh and Amber. The greenery after the monsoons give this whole place a feel of heavenly sensation, with JAL MAHAL in the back ground.

Jaigarh Fort
The Jaigarh fort is the most spectacular of the three-hilltop forts that overlook Jaipur. In Mughal times, the Jaipur region was a major weapon-producing centre for the Mughal and Rajput rulers, several of which are on display in the fort's museum. It is one of the few military structures of medieval India preserved almost intact, containing palaces, a granary, a well-planned cannon foundry, several temples, a tall tower and a giant mounted cannon-the Jai Ban (Jaivan) which is the largest cannon in the world. Jaigarh Fort is also known as the fort of victory. The display includes a collection of canons, many of which are exquisitely decorated and were used in the Mughal campaigns led by the Rajput King, Raja Man Singh.

Of the Jaipur's three forts, Jaigarh is perhaps the most motivating. It does not have those delicate structures or palaces like that of Amber but if you want a quick look at a hard-core fortress, this is it. Jaigarh means `Victory Fort' and was built between the 15th and the 18th century, and stands 15 km from Jaipur, amidst rock-strewn, thorn-scrub covered hills, its forbidding stone ramparts are visible from the Jaipur town. A steep road goes up to the main gate, the Dungar Darwaza, from where the view is stupendous.

It was the royal treasury for several years. It was one of the few ancient Indian military structures to be kept intact through the ages. There are passageways among the palaces and you can see a collection of coins and puppets. This fort is open to public since a few years only. It was sealed for seven years, due to a rumour, that an enormous treasure in gold was buried, in the fort area. The government ransacked the fort, emptied the reservoirs of water but found nothing.

Jaigarh was once responsible for the security of both Jaipur and Amber, is a huge moated fort and contains all the accoutrements of a full-fledged citadel. 1 ½ or 2 hours are usually enough to explore it- don't bother taking a guide; there isn't much use for one, and sections like the armoury and the museum have adequate signs.

Entrance fee to Jaigarh is Rs. 20 for foreign tourists and Rs 10 for Indian tourists.

Nahargarh Fort
Nahargarh Fort is located on the sheer rugged ridge of Aravali Hills and it forms an impressive northern backdrop of Jaipur. It looks most classy when floodlit at night. The fort overlooks the city and presents a glittering view of the city lights. It was built in 1734 and extended in 1868. Nahargarh meaning abode of the tigers was built by Jai Singh to bolster the defence of Amber. The legend also have it that it was named Nahargarh after Nahar Singh a prince whose spirit would destroy the construction and not allow its progress further. So after a tantrik prayer to the spirit it agreed to leave on condition that the fort is named after him. The Madhavendra Bhawan, built by Sawai Ram Singh II has uniquely a cluster of 12 identical suits for queens and at the head is a suit for the king himself. The rooms are linked by corridors and retain some delicate frescos as well as toilets and kitchen hearths. It was used by members of the royal family for excursion in summers and is now even a favoured picnic spot. Durg Cafeteria just above the entrance sells meals and refreshments, while Padao Restaurant on the west sells drinks around sunset.

Amber
Amber (pronounced Amer) is situated about 11 kilometres from Jaipur and was the ancient citadel of the ruling Kachhawa clan of Amber, before the capital was shifted in the plains to present day Jaipur.

The Amber Fort set in picturesque and rugged hills is a fascinating blend of Hindu and Mughal architecture. Constructed by Raja Man Singh I in 1592 and completed by Sawai Jai Singh I the fort is made in red sand stone and white marble. The rugged forbidding exterior belies an inner paradise with a beautiful fusion of art and architecture. Amber is the classic and romantic fort- palace with a magnificent aura. The interior wall of the palace depicts expressive painting scenes with carvings, precious stones and mirror settings. In the foreground is the Maota Lake providing a breathtaking look. Built mainly for the warring enemies as a safe place, the heavily structured walls could defend the residents within the ramparts of the fort.

All the means of survival & luxuries for the royal families and the people who were concerned with the functioning of this small kingdom of the Kachhawas were well provided. The Rajputs who had apparently won a small structure passed on by Meena tribes, later on renovated it into the grand Amber Fort. Holding a history so old as 7 centuries, this place vibrates with its legendry past, in the archaeological history. Although many of the early structures have been literally ruined but at the same time, those dating from the 16th century on are remarkably preserved by sincere efforts.

The fort has 4 sections; each with the premises and one has to climb up through the imposing stairway or else the broad aisle, where one can ride on the elephant back for royal feel. The main gate Surajpol that leads to the Jaleb chowk , which is the main courtyard from where one can walk up the stairway, that leads to the palace. Jaleb Chowk was also the area where returning armies were welcome and they would display their war earnings to the population at large.

Before you enter the palace just towards the right is a sleep aisle and a narrow staircase reaching up to Kali Temple also called Shila Devi Temple famous for its mysterious history and the huge silver lions. It is a gorgeous temple featuring silver doors with raised relief. According to a legend, Maharaja Man Singh I had worshiped the Goddess for a victory over the rulers of Bengal. The Goddess appeared in the Maharaja's dream and ordered him to recover her statue lying under sea near Jessore (now in Bangladesh) and install it in a befitting Temple. True enough, after subjugating the enemies the Maharaja recovered the statute from the bed of the sea. The temple is called after Shila Devi, "shila" meaning stone slab. Like all temples this too has an image of Ganesha on the doorway, but carved from a single piece of coral.

Getting back from the temple the main stairways lead to the second courtyard of the fort. Here situated is the imposing Diwan-I-Aam, the hall of public audiences where the Maharaja received the populace and their petitions. This is a pavilion of double row of columns each capped by an elephant shape. There is a lattice gallery also.

Behind the exquisite and fabulous Ganesh Pol , "pol" meaning gate are located in the residential apartments of the Maharaja. The Jai Mandir , the Hall of Victory is famous for its inlaid panel and dazzling mirror ceiling. Much of it had deteriorated with neglect and is under restoration.

On the other side is Sukh Niwas, the residence of pleasure or pleasurable residence. The palace has an ivory inlaid sandalwood door. A channeled laid for flow of water is an inventive system of cooling. The water flowing from the channel wasn't wasted as it was allowed to flow in the garden. From there you can also take pleasure in viewing of the fort rampart and its reflection in the Moata Lake .

The Zenana or the palace of the women are in the forth courtyard. The rooms are though connected through a common corridor are cleverly designed to give each room privacy.

Museums

Albart Hall

City Palace Museums

Parks
Kanan Vrindavan

Sisodia Rani ka Bagh
Sawai Jai Singh built it in 1728. The garden is laid in Mughal style and it depicts the legends of Radha and Krishna. The garden is located 8 kms from Jaipur - Agra road .It consists of tiered multi-level gardens with fountains, watercourses and painted pavilions. Sawai Jai Singh built it for his Sisodia Queen from Udaipur. The palace house has several galleries, pavilions and beautiful murals depicting scenes from the life of lord Krishna.

Vidyadhar Gardens

Located near the Sisodia Gardens,it is a beautiful vineyard, which unfolds itself in the valley. It is named after Vidyadhar Bhatacharjee the architect of Jaipur.
Lakes
Galtaji
It is an ancient pilgrimage centre lying beyond the gardens amidst low hills. Temples, pavilions and holy kunds (natural spring and water tanks) along with lush landscape make it a delightful spot. The small temple of the Sun God built by Diwan Kriparam on the top of the highest peak is a visible city landmark.
Temples
Govind Dev Ji Temple
A vital part of the city Palace complex, this Krishna temple has been highly preserved by the erstwhile royal family. Sawai Jai Singh installed the image of GOVIND DEV JI(an incarnation of lord Krishna) after it was brought from Vrindavan. Housed within the sanctum of this spire less temple, the patron deity of the royal family is very religiously worshipped by most of the Hindus in the city and near by areas. The image is unveiled seven times daily for 'AARTIES' and BHOGS offered in the silver wares, consisting of sweets mostly. The idols of RADHA KRISHNA are dressed in different styles each time for the 'AARTI' procession where thousands of followers or 'Bhakt' gather around the courtyard for the Darshan (a look connecting them with the divine).

Birla Lakshmi-Narayan Temple
Birla Mandir or the Lakshmi - Narayan Temple, situated just below the Moti Dungari. This is a modern temple built of white marble on top of a hill, dominating the skyline of south Jaipur. The Birlas (industrialists who have also built several temples in India) built this temple. The temple has been constructed in white marble and has three domes, each portraying the different approaches to religion. The presiding deities here are Vishnu (One of the Hindu Trilogy Gods) called Narayan and his consort Lakshmi Goddess of wealth and good fortune. The temple is built is white in marble and exterior has carved sculptures of various mythological themes and images of saints. The interior has large panel in marble of mythological proceedings. The images of the deities are placed in the sanctum sanctorum. Built on raised ground, it is surrounded by large lush green gardens.

Moti Dungri (Ganesh Temple)
Fair & Festivals
Elephant Festival

Gangaur Festival

Jaipur Festival

Teej Festival

Kite Festival
Around Jaipur
Tonk and the persian art
It is located, 96 kms away from Jaipur. This is a quiet town which was ruled by tribes of 'Pathans' from Afghanistan. The focal point of Tonk is the Suneri Kothi, the Golden Bungalow. A fairly ordinary monument from outside, it has stunningly rich ornamental interiors. There are also some interesting building that accommodated the British office. Tonk is also famous for its leather and felt industry and one can pick up a good bargain from the markets. The Nawab of Tonk was an avid book lover and built a sizable library of Arabic and Persian manuscripts. Arabic and Persian Research Institute are also located here.

Sanganer
Sanganer is located 16 Kms from Jaipur. It is also known for exquisite Jain temples. Moreover, it is an important centre for crafts and hand-printed textiles that is internationally famous.

The most beautiful temple in Sanganer is the ancient Shri Digamber Jain temple . The temple has fine carvings as those of the magnificent Dilwara temples of Mount Abu. Built in various phases with sky-high shikharas (spires), the temple represents an old style of architecture. The last phase was probably built in the 10th century. The beautiful nij-mandir (inner temple) is a stone shrine with three pinnacles. In the centre is an idol of Parshwanath with 7 serpent hoods . All around it, are carvings of lotuses, creepers and elephants pouring water from pitchers held in their trunks. But the main idol is that of Adinath, installed in the shrine behind this.

The town is most famous for its hand paper and mostly screen-printed fabric. The fabric is popular for small floral designs. A wide variety of material for apparels, furnishing and curtaining is available. Some of the traditional designs were produced in the patronage of the royal family. It is a beautiful sight to see brightly colour fabric drying out in the sun near the river.

Sawai Jai Singh II set up a paper business in Sanganer on the outskirts of Jaipur. It is said that in the 16th century, the ruler of Amber, Raja Man Singh, brought Kagzis to Sanganer (situated on the bank of Saraswati River, where abundant clear water was available). The town emerged as one of the biggest paper making centres in northern India. In between, however the industry did get a setback, but after independence, the Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC) included the handmade paper in its agenda for promotion of crafts.

It is famous for kagazi mohulla (handmade paper) and block printing and is the world's largest centre of hand-made paper. Sanganer is blessed with water and open spaces, essential for papermaking. From here the Kagzis enjoyed patronage of the royal court of Sawai Man Singh and his successors. Today there are about 10 hand-made paper industries in Sanganer, all owned by Kagzis. Of these the largest is Salim Kagzi's Handmade Paper and Board Industries. All Sanganer paper makers are the largest producers of hand-made paper in the world. The airport of Jaipur is also located in Sanganer.

Bagru
It is located 30 kms away from Jaipur on the Ajmer Road and is well known for its Bagru prints. This technique simulates a wooden block on which the required design is first carved, then the carved block is used for transferring the motif in the desired colour on the fabric. This process is most effective on ethnic floral patterns and for printing in vegetable dyes in traditional Bagru Prints.

Samod
The fort is an old fortified residence of the Nathawat family (hailing from chomu) that served as the Prime Ministers of the Jaipur Royal Court is located some 40km from Jaipur and 264 km from Delhi in the range of Aravali. This magnificent fort is as charming and romantic in itself, and exhibits grandeur , good taste, class and elegance. The way to the fort's main entrance is through the inside of the village, which can be covered from the highway by a camel safari, with the locals welcoming the guests with smiles and thrilling expressions. The inside of the fort reflects expressions of the medieval architecture that is renovated a bit for the oriental formality. The open courtyards in the centre has separate wings on the sides that extends to 43 spacious rooms & suites having private balconies and views. The walls are in warm colours to highlight the intricate marble work, the antiques and the colourful art with traditional artefacts. The Durbar hall of Samode Palace is one of the most beautifully painted chambers with glass & minakari work and the same goes for the private restricted spaces- meant for the "zannanis",  women of the family.


Sariska Tiger Reserve

Ranthambhor National Park

Abhaneri

Abhaneri is a village about 95 kms from Jaipur on the Jaipur-Agra Road. A detour is well merited for its amazing step wells or 'baoris' and Harshat Mata Temple. According to a legend, the village is so called because the Goddess Harshat Mata who is shown portrayed in a joyous mood is believed to spread brightness or "abha" all around. The village's original name was Abha Nagri, and its name today is Abhaneri.

It is believed that the celebrated king Raja Chand established the village. On the other hand it is felt that the mythological Raja Chand could be King Bhoja, who ruled over the Gurjar kingdom in the ninth century AD. The ruins of the temple also speaks of the 10th century architectural and sculptural styles. There is a huge tank named "Chand Baori", opposite to the temple fortified on all four sides with bastions for defence. Even though Abhaneri is now in ruins, the place has a distinct reminiscence about itself. It is best approached by road, buses ply between Jaipur and Agra.

Kaurali
Located at 182 kms southwest of Jaipur, it was founded in 1348 and is best known for its Krishna Temples. The Fort, which was constructed over different period, is about 600 years old. The fort was the residence for the royal family until 1950 and is now occupied by monkeys and geese. The geese were used in the early days as warning system against any intruders. They still seem to be doing their duty. The Bhawar Vilas Palace, which is owned by the descendents of the royal family and resembles a large manor, is a hotel now. The rooms are comfortable and good meals are available. Karauli is best connected by bus or taxi from Jaipur.


Union territories

Metropolitan cities of India

Metropolitan cities of India

 

 
 

This portal is designed by
Arindam Bhowmik
Best viewed with 1024 by 768 Screen Resolution